Practice Makes Perfect: Interim Summary of High Fidelity Mock Code Blue Simulation at The Ottawa Hospital.
CCCF ePoster library. Soliman D. Oct 27, 2015; 114762; P89
Dr. Daniel Soliman
Dr. Daniel Soliman
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Abstract
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P89


Topic: Education Science


Practice Makes Perfect: Interim Summary of High Fidelity Mock Code Blue Simulation at The Ottawa Hospital.



Daniel Soliman, S. Holland, N. Gupta, L. Boyle

Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada | Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada | Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada | Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Introduction:

Since January 2015, bi-monthly “mock code blue” high-fidelity simulations have been conducted at The Ottawa Hospital. The aims of the mock code blue project are to increase multi-disciplinary code blue team confidence and resource management skills with ACLS protocols and to identify technical and non-technical challenges with ACLS events on inpatient wards.



Objectives: NA

Methods:

A high fidelity ACLS simulation mannequin and specifically designed ACLS resuscitation scenarios based on reversible causes of cardiac arrest are used for each simulation. An unannounced mock code blue is called as per hospital protocol on inpatient Internal Medicine wards. The code blue team responds and performs a simulated resuscitation. Designated research confederates record time and event data critical to the adherence of ACLS algorithms as well as technical, non-technical, human and system issues occurring during the scenario. After the scenario is completed, a formal structured debrief is held with the code blue team to review key events and constructively review errors that occurred.



Results:

After conducting 8 mock code blue scenarios, our results document that code leader identification occurs in 2:17 ± 1:32 minutes. Cardiac monitor placement occurs in 3:55 ± 3:01 minutes, and a definitive airway is secured in 8:28 ± 1:36 minutes. Latent safety threats identified include: lack of glucometer on crash cart, lack of awareness of cardiac monitor settings, backboards placed in inaccessible locations, difficulty locating patient charts, trouble operating the AED mode of the defibrillator, and lack of closed loop communication.



Conclusion:

This study represents a quantitative and qualitative assessment of multi-disciplinary code blue performances on inpatient internal medicine wards. Through in-situ simulations at the Ottawa Hospital, we have established a sustainable method to augment technical skills, correct system and safety issues as well as improve efficiency and resource management. Through debriefing, we have enhanced learning and consolidation of ACLS protocols and code blue team dynamics in high-stress situations. In summary, in-situ ACLS resuscitation allows for timely systematic improvements to quality of care delivered during critical events.



References: NA
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