An Analysis of Reporting According to the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments) Guidelines for Pre-Clinical Studies of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury
CCCF ePoster library. Avey M. Oct 27, 2015; 117360; P94 Disclosure(s): This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/193.html) Knowledge Synthesis Grant (KRS126596)
Marc Avey
Marc Avey
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

You may also access this content "anytime, anywhere" with the Free MULTILEARNING App for iOS and Android
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
P94


Topic: Basic/Translational Science


An Analysis of Reporting According to the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments) Guidelines for Pre-Clinical Studies of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury



Marc Avey, D. Moher, D. Fergusson, G. Griffin, J. Grimshaw, B. Hutton, M. Lalu, M. Macleod, J. Marshall, S. Mei, M. Rudnicki, D. Stewart, K. Sullivan, A. Turgeon, L. McIntyre

Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Department of Anesthesiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Universityof Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom (Great Britain) | Department of Surgery (Critical Care), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada | Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Regenerative Medicine Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada | D

Introduction:

An Analysis of Reporting According to the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments) Guidelines for Pre-Clinical Studies of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury



Objectives:

We aimed to assess the completeness of reporting of studies of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for the treatment of acute lung injury in animal models using the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments(ARRIVE) guidelines[2], and National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Principles and Guidelines for Reporting Preclinical Research [3,4]. We also assessed whether there was a relationship between the completeness of reporting and journal impact factor, and whether articles published after the ARRIVE guidelines were associated with improved reporting.



Methods:

As part of a systematic review we previously identified 47 preclinical studies that tested MSCs for the treatment of acute lung injury. We operationalized the ARRIVE guidelines into 109 discrete reporting items and extracted a total of 5,123 data elements from 47 studies.We evaluated the completeness of reporting based on ARRIVE sections (e.g. methods, results) and sub-sections (e.g. experimental procedures; Fig. 1), and corresponding sets of items from the NIH’s Principles and Guidelines for Reporting Preclinical Research. For journal impact factor we used the year 2013 and assessed the relationship with a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. We divided the studies into those that were published prior to and after the publication date of ARRIVE plus one year and assessed the relationship with a Wilcoxon signed-rank test.



Results:

Overall, studies reported 47% of all items (median 51; range 37 – 64). Across all studies, the methods sections reported less than half (45%) of the 87 items evaluated, and the results sections less than a third (29%). The reporting by ARRIVE sub-sections ranged from 0% (Adverse Events) to 100% (Objectives) across studies (Fig. 1). The NIH’s ‘core’ reporting items were infrequently reported: replicates 37%, statistics 33%, randomization 16%, blinding 31%, sample-size estimation 2%, and inclusion and exclusion criteria 4%. Reporting of details of biological materials used was less than a third (28%) for details ofexperimental animals, but more than two thirds (73%) for details of stem cells used were reported. There was no association between impact factor of the journal and completeness of reporting, as the average percentages of items reported in low impact journals (median 51; impact factor <=4) and high impact journals (median 49; impact factor >4) were similar (p=0.67).Factoring in a 1-year time allowance after publication of ARRIVE, there was a significant increase in the median number of items reported in articles that were published after the ARRIVE guidelines (p=0.01; before 47.5, after 53).



Conclusion:

Incomplete reporting is a major issue in preclinical studies evaluating MSCs to treat acute lung injury. The incomplete reporting is not limited to a few elements of research design, but applies generallyto the reporting of the methods and results, and this will impede attempts to replicate research findings.We did not see substantially better reporting in journals of higher impact. There was a small improvement in the quality of reporting before and after the publication of the ARRIVE guidelines.



References:

1. Collins FS, Tabak LA. Policy: NIH plans to enhance reproducibility. Nature. 2014;505: 612–613. doi:10.1038/505612a

2. Kilkenny C, Browne WJ, Cuthill IC, Emerson M, Altman DG. Improving Bioscience Research Reporting: The ARRIVE Guidelines for Reporting Animal Research. PLoS Biol. 2010;8: e1000412. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000412

3. McNutt M. Journals unite for reproducibility. Science. 2014;346: 679.

4. National Institutes of Health. Principles and Guidelines for Reporting Preclinical Research [Internet]. 2015. Available: http://www.nih.gov/about/reporting-preclinical-research.htm

    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings